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How much yarn do I need for a border?

How much yarn do I need for a border?

So to calculate yarn needed to keep in reserve for my final border is just 3.6 – 2.5 or 1.1 oz. Yes, just follow your afghan pattern until you have 1.1 oz (or whatever amount of yarn you calculated for your final border), then knit the border and cast off.

How do you crochet a border?

Here’s how: Slip stitch the border color into the second stitch to the left of the corner. Single crochet in the next stitch to the right. Chain 2 for the corner. Crab stitch in each stitch to the next corner; chain 2 for the corner. Repeat these steps until the border is on all sides.

How do you add a border to a crochet blanket?

Adding Your Own Blanket Stitching. To add a blanket stitch, use a coordinating color of crochet thread or separate strands from the yarn you plan to use for the border. Insert the hook into the fabric, and pull up a loop of the thread to the height of the edge of the blanket (Fig. 2b). Then, yarn over and pull through both loops on hook (Fig. 2c).

How to crochet a border on a blanket?

Even out your blanket edges with single crochet or double crochet.

  • You can start at any corner of the blanket or the last one you worked into
  • For round one,chain three and double crochet around the blanket. For every corner,you’ll work double crochet,chain one,and double crochet
  • Double crochet,chain one in the same space of your chain three and join to the first stitch with a slip stitch
  • Chain three for round two,front post double crochet,back post double crochet,and repeat to corner in chain one space where you’ll work double crochet,chain one,and double
  • Repeat working front post double crochet,back post double crochet on the next corner,and work double crochet,chain one,and double crochet
  • When joining,double crochet,chain one in the chain three space with a slip stitch
  • Fasten off or widen the border according to preference
  • What is a crochet pattern?

    Crochet patterns are worked in either rows or rounds (rnds). Each pattern will specify whether you are working in rows, rounds or a combination of both. Most crochet patterns are rated according to level of difficulty, including beginner, easy, intermediate and advanced.